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Studio Photography 101

Studio photography offers a blank template for a photographer to create virtually any setting and tone he desires. Mix up your shoots with various professional backdrops and floor drops, experiment with studio lighting techniques, and implement all kinds of posing props! If you’re new to the studio it all can seem daunting, but don’t let that stand in the way of creating your dream photo setup!
6 Tips for Setting Up a Home Studio

6 Tips for Setting Up a Home Studio

If you’re making the transition from photography enthusiast to professional, you’ve probably thought about setting up your own home studio. Before you make the leap and open your home to clients, be sure you have a set-up that will deliver professional results. 

Prop Styling for Photo Shoots

Prop Styling for Photo Shoots

Prop styling is a fun and creative way to add that extra panache to your images. Clients will appreciate a professionally styled shot that utilizes props to illustrate their products’ features and gets customers motivated to buy. If you don’t have the budget to hire a professional stylist, spend some time learning the nuances of prop styling.

12 Indispensable Tools for the Studio Photographer

12 Indispensable Tools for the Studio Photographer

We all know about cameras and lighting equipment and all the usual stuff that photographers need to make pictures, but what about all the other little things that go into making a photographer’s life complete? You know, those items that sit forever on your shelf gathering dust until the day comes when you cannot live without it?

Why Should You Use Studio Backdrops?

Why Should You Use Studio Backdrops?

While there are many inexpensive substitutes to a studio backdrop such as a bed sheet or plain wall, you will soon discover that “you get what you pay for”, and that using a nice solid photo backdrop is a great idea irrespective of your desire to cut costs.

Studio vs. Outdoor Photography

Studio vs. Outdoor Photography

At its best photography is inspired by light. Whether it’s a rich shade of purple on a canyon for two minutes following sunset, or the warm cast of tungsten lamps on a model’s bare skin, it’s the light that guides our work. It doesn’t matter if I’m shooting indoors or out, my focus on finding great light is the same. 

Using Your Imagination with Floor Drops

Using Your Imagination with Floor Drops

Go into your studio. Take a look down at your feet. Now go a few inches farther down and take a good look at the floor. It’s probably dirty, and no amount of cleaning is going to make it look any better than it is now. Don’t worry, there is a solution, especially if you’re going to create something beside your standard backdrop: Floor Drops

Working with Pets in Studio

Working with Pets in Studio

Allow me to introduce you to our subject of the day. Meet Nigel. He is a 16-week-old fawn Great Dane puppy and has spent quite a bit of time in front of my lens lately.

Should You Set Up Your Own Studio?

Should You Set Up Your Own Studio?

The first thing that can be said of a studio is that it is important to keep it filled up. With clients, that is. It’s important, especially if you’re renting a space, to make sure it pays for itself. 

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